Tag Archives: rebalancing

2014 financial resolutions: An update

I posted a blog in early January 2014 outlining my seven financial resolutions for the new year. I’ve made some progress, but frankly, I have some considerable work yet to do.

Here’s an update:

Financial resolutions for the new year

Like millions of Americans, I make a list of New Year’s resolutions each year that, come March, are all but out the window. This year, it’s going to be different. I’ve already hopped on the treadmill and made some progress … Read more

Why I still own Treasuries

Bond funds have generally been on a total return “tear” the past several years, given the sharp decline in U.S. Treasury yields.

Bond fund cash flows have been solid, especially into corporate and municipal bond funds, which tend to carry … Read more

A sign of slumbering—or of hope?

A Wall Street Journal report, published on February 21, notes that small-capitalization stock prices, as measured by the Russell 2000 Index, are nearing an all-time high. But investors aren’t pouring money into small-cap stocks.

The story, “Small-cap rise is big … Read more

Market volatility and the "Rebalancing Frown"

Given all the market volatility, a lot of folks are wondering about whether now might be the right time to rebalance their portfolio.

Vanguard researchers present an in-depth discussion of rebalancing in this paper. This analysis emphasizes that historically, … Read more

Coping with stock market drops

I’ve been investing in stocks through mutual funds for more than 30 years. I’ve known all along that periodic swoons come with the territory. I’ve experienced the October 1987 crash, the 2000–2002 bursting of the tech-stock bubble, and the kerflop … Read more

Rebalancing: What’s your trigger?

You probably know that Vanguard advocates periodic rebalancing as a way to manage risk in investment portfolios.

Our Investment Counseling & Research Group, overseen by my fellow blogger John Ameriks, has written a detailed white paper on rebalancing. John weighed … Read more

Levers we can control

One of the biggest frustrations for investors is that there is one huge factor no one can control—the returns that the financial markets are going to provide in any given stretch of time.

When we first start investing, we probably … Read more

Making the right move

The idea of not making any market moves is based on the assumption that before the bear market started and the recession kicked in, you were rational and had put together a balanced portfolio — diversifying your risks and reflecting your risk tolerance.

Visit vanguard.com or contact your broker to obtain a Vanguard ETF or fund prospectus which contains investment objectives, risks, charges, expenses, and other information; read and consider carefully before investing.

Vanguard ETF Shares are not redeemable with the issuing Fund other than in Creation Unit aggregations. Instead, investors must buy or sell Vanguard ETF Shares in the secondary market with the assistance of a stockbroker. In doing so, the investor may incur brokerage commissions and may pay more than net asset value when buying and receive less than net asset value when selling.

Investments in bond funds are subject to interest rate, credit, and inflation risk.

Diversification does not ensure a profit or protect against a loss in a declining market.

Foreign investing involves additional risks including currency fluctuations and political uncertainty.

Stocks of companies in emerging markets are generally more risky than stocks of companies in developed countries.

An investment in a money market fund is not insured or guaranteed by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation or any other government agency. Although a money market fund seeks to preserve the value of your investment at $1 per share, it is possible to lose money by investing in such a fund.

All investing is subject to risk, including possible loss of principal.

Vanguard Marketing Corporation, Distributor

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