Tag Archives: interest rates

The Fed’s “great escape”

In the great inspirational movie The Shawshank Redemption, Tim Robbins plays Andy Dufresne, a man facing seemingly impossible odds: Wrongly imprisoned for life, former banker Andy has only the books in the paltry prison library, his love of carving … Read more

A failure to communicate

If you first learned how to think about saving and investing as I did, from a passbook savings account, bond funds can seem like a world turned upside down. I was reminded of this a few days ago when an … Read more

The outlook for bonds: Are the good times about to end?

U.S. interest rates today are clearly low and below historical long-term averages. Recalling the double-digit rates of the 1970s and early 1980s, I still find it somewhat astonishing that the yields on a broadly diversified basket of high-quality bonds (whether … Read more

Monetary policy’s sacrificial lambs

A few months ago, my wife and I opened a small savings account for our young children to help teach them the power of saving. Compound interest. All that good stuff.

We talked about taking their pennies, dimes, and birthday … Read more

Interest rates: a worry for 2010

It’s still early in the new year, and there’s lots to worry about in the investment domain and in the broader world. But one item tops my “worry list” for 2010: interest rates. And it’s hard to decide which is … Read more

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