Tag Archives: indexing

Avoiding risk? You might not be

I don’t consider myself a risk-taker. I change the batteries in my smoke detectors, double check that my doors are locked, and always wear my seat belt. I can absolutely relate to the fear that many young people have when … Read more

The roots of index investing

In our own quiet way, we’re celebrating 35 years of indexing at Vanguard this year. (Hey, you wouldn’t expect party hats and champagne at Vanguard!)

Indexing is an amazing success story—and not just at Vanguard. From a controversial, much-derided idea … Read more

Are you an ambidextrous investor?

If you’ve heard of Pat Venditte—a minor league pitcher in the Yankees organization—you may know he has an extra tool in his arsenal. It’s not another pitch, but another arm.

He’s ambidextrous and changes his pitching arm depending on the … Read more

Active or passive?

In 1976, Vanguard launched its 500 Index Fund, making it the first index mutual fund available to non-institutional investors. The creation of an index fund intended for individual investors was an important salvo in the now long-running battle over … Read more

Forecasts and second marriages

Even from its recent lows, the S&P 500 Index would have to drop another 30% or so to get back to the level that had me counseling caution back in 1995.

Visit vanguard.com or contact your broker to obtain a Vanguard ETF or fund prospectus which contains investment objectives, risks, charges, expenses, and other information; read and consider carefully before investing.

Vanguard ETF Shares are not redeemable with the issuing Fund other than in Creation Unit aggregations. Instead, investors must buy or sell Vanguard ETF Shares in the secondary market with the assistance of a stockbroker. In doing so, the investor may incur brokerage commissions and may pay more than net asset value when buying and receive less than net asset value when selling.

Investments in bond funds are subject to interest rate, credit, and inflation risk.

Diversification does not ensure a profit or protect against a loss in a declining market.

Foreign investing involves additional risks including currency fluctuations and political uncertainty.

Stocks of companies in emerging markets are generally more risky than stocks of companies in developed countries.

An investment in a money market fund is not insured or guaranteed by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation or any other government agency. Although a money market fund seeks to preserve the value of your investment at $1 per share, it is possible to lose money by investing in such a fund.

All investing is subject to risk, including possible loss of principal.

Vanguard Marketing Corporation, Distributor

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