Tag Archives: 401(k)

98% stayed the course

I read the headlines, same as you. Investors are panicking. During the drive in to work today, I listened to a radio business show. A correspondent talked about the flood of selling and the deep sense of fear in financial …

401(k) fee literacy

According to a recent survey, more than 70% of participants in 401(k) retirement plans think they pay no fees on their accounts. Less than a quarter got the answer right, acknowledging that they do, in fact, pay fees.

It’s …

Understanding 401(k) fees

As I’ve discussed in prior blog posts, 401(k) account balances for many Americans have recovered as a result of better financial markets and ongoing contributions. In tandem, the debate over 401(k)s has shifted—to the question of fees.

Critics share …

The new retirement

A new poll from Gallup says that Americans expect to depend more on Social Security when they retire—and less on 401(k)s, IRAs, and part-time work. I don’t believe it for a minute.…

401(k) ratings: Caveat lector

While I have been publishing research for many years, I consider myself new to the blogosphere. So I was a little surprised when my recent post on a new 401(k) rating service, Brightscope, elicited some response, including a critique

Rating your 401(k)

401(k) accounts are typically among the largest assets held by middle- and upper-middle-income households in the United States. So naturally they draw a lot of attention—in the marketplace, in the media, and in Washington. The government, for example, is proposing …

The “pink slip” risk in retirement planning

I’ve mentioned in several previous posts that the anxiety about 401(k) balances has been largely overstated, in part because of the beneficial effects of ongoing contributions and diversified portfolios. This point has come across as Pollyanna-ish to some of you, …

Another look at 401(k) accounts

I elicited some grief from certain Vanguard Blog readers by talking about a recovery in 401(k) accounts earlier this year. Allow me to provide an update on the issue.

Recall my basic premise: As a result of ongoing contributions, …

401(k) performance: The numbers add up

I’m a little tired of reading about how “buy and hold” is dead, and diversification doesn’t work, and how “target-date funds don’t work,” and that there was too much risk, especially for pre-retirees, in these balanced funds. These stories seem …

Bad facts, bad story

There are only two reasons you appear on the cover of Time magazine—either you are receiving plaudits from the media, or you’re about to be tarred and feathered. 401(k)s are featured on the cover of Time this week, and it’s …

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