Investing

Yesterday’s news

Steve Utkus, one of my fellow bloggers, wrote recently about the dubious value of a local radio station’s early-morning reports on where the S&P 500 and Nasdaq markets are likely to open the day, based on futures trading. He labeled … Read more

Investing

Target-date risks

Criticism of target-date funds is heating up in the aftermath of hearings by the SEC and the Department of Labor. But rather than illuminating the retirement investing problem, the discussion has only highlighted a yawning deficit in the public debate.… Read more

Retirement

Your 401(k): Nest egg or slush fund?

One of our readers recently asked about Vanguard’s view on 401(k) loans.

As you might know if you’ve poked around Vanguard.com, we generally frown upon retirement plan loans, to put it mildly. In fact, Vanguard’s intranet for employees recently featured … Read more

Personal finance

Your comments, please

From the day we launched this blog in March, we’ve received plenty of feedback on our policy of not publishing readers’ comments.

Most of you, it’s fair to say, wished we would change the policy. Well, I’ve got some news … Read more

Retirement

Retirement? What retirement?

Faced with a reduced (but recovering—so far) portfolio, children still in college, and not a clue what else I would rather do, I’ve given some thought to simply working forever. Not a bad plan, if I can manage it.

Many … Read more

Investing

Peter L. Bernstein, 1919-2009

The vast majority of what you read and hear about investing focuses on returns. As in, what mutual fund, or stock, or asset class investors ought to buy now to garner the best return for some indeterminate period. Or which … Read more

Investing

The sound of cannon

Apparently the Rothschilds, the great banking family, had a saying about when to commit capital: “Buy at the sound of cannon; sell at the sound of violins.”

Although they probably were thinking about political instability, the saying has a contemporary … Read more

Investing

“Mattress risk”

Given the recent market crisis, we’ve heard a lot about how the “only safe place” to invest your money is your mattress.

One of my colleagues forwarded me this story from CNN. It’s about an older woman who had … Read more

Personal finance

“Generation D” redux

Thank you for all of your comments on my “Generation D” blog post. We heard from students, recent grads, parents, and investors. Your comments were insightful and passionate, and pointed to several major themes.

Some of you admitted to, or … Read more

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Visit vanguard.com or contact your broker to obtain a Vanguard ETF or fund prospectus which contains investment objectives, risks, charges, expenses, and other information; read and consider carefully before investing.

Vanguard ETF Shares are not redeemable with the issuing Fund other than in Creation Unit aggregations. Instead, investors must buy or sell Vanguard ETF Shares in the secondary market with the assistance of a stockbroker. In doing so, the investor may incur brokerage commissions and may pay more than net asset value when buying and receive less than net asset value when selling.

Investments in bond funds are subject to interest rate, credit, and inflation risk.

Diversification does not ensure a profit or protect against a loss in a declining market.

Foreign investing involves additional risks including currency fluctuations and political uncertainty.

Stocks of companies in emerging markets are generally more risky than stocks of companies in developed countries.

An investment in a money market fund is not insured or guaranteed by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation or any other government agency. Although a money market fund seeks to preserve the value of your investment at $1 per share, it is possible to lose money by investing in such a fund.

All investing is subject to risk, including possible loss of principal.

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