Investing

Opinions on market trends and investing strategies.

Killer bees and high-cost funds

In the 1970s, nothing was scarier than walking around New York City. You know, all those alligators in the sewer.

And if a murderous reptile didn’t attack you from an open manhole, you had to worry about the killer bees … Read more

Recent Posts

The “best” place to put your money NOW for 2012

I have to admit up front that if you’re reading this blog based on the title, you’re in for a bit of a surprise, and I hope you won’t feel too bad about being hoodwinked.

Articles with titles like this … Read more

Irrationally rational or rationally irrational?

I remember first being introduced to the concept of market efficiency during business school. At the time, I was working for a large Wall Street firm in close proximity to the equity trading floor. As I thought about the precision … Read more

History — An imperfect guide to the future

There’s a good reason why regulators require financial firms to include, when mentioning the past returns or ratings of a mutual fund, the warning: “Past performance is not a guarantee of future results.”

The warning is true. History is an … Read more

Need proof?

In response to my most recent post, “Give ‘thoughtomation’ a try,” I received this helpful idea from a reader:

“Why don’t you post a spreadsheet with comparisons of saving early vs saving late in life? That is the most important Read more

Stopping the silent killer of returns

There continues to be a lot of focus on the consequences of today’s low-rate environment. In such an environment, one of the most important things an investor can do is economize on the cost of the financial services they’re buying … Read more

Maybe a lost decade for stocks, but not for investors

In the past, I have expressed frustration with the financial press’s coverage of investment topics (Clearing the air on target date performance), and I’ve also blogged about how I feel investors are best served by ignoring financial pundits (Listening Read more

Ripped from the headlines—or just ripped off?

Many of my fellow bloggers have written about the recent turmoil in the markets. Rather than add my two cents to what has already been very well articulated, I’d like to take a different angle.

Have you noticed anything different … Read more

Our own devices

I have to admit, I can’t live without my smart phone. The ability to be constantly connected to my friends, take care of e-mails in between other tasks, or check the news from anywhere is an incredible convenience. It’s also … Read more

Market volatility and the "Rebalancing Frown"

Given all the market volatility, a lot of folks are wondering about whether now might be the right time to rebalance their portfolio.

Vanguard researchers present an in-depth discussion of rebalancing in this paper. This analysis emphasizes that historically, … Read more

Coping with stock market drops

I’ve been investing in stocks through mutual funds for more than 30 years. I’ve known all along that periodic swoons come with the territory. I’ve experienced the October 1987 crash, the 2000–2002 bursting of the tech-stock bubble, and the kerflop … Read more

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Visit vanguard.com or contact your broker to obtain a Vanguard ETF or fund prospectus which contains investment objectives, risks, charges, expenses, and other information; read and consider carefully before investing.

Vanguard ETF Shares are not redeemable with the issuing Fund other than in Creation Unit aggregations. Instead, investors must buy or sell Vanguard ETF Shares in the secondary market with the assistance of a stockbroker. In doing so, the investor may incur brokerage commissions and may pay more than net asset value when buying and receive less than net asset value when selling.

Investments in bond funds are subject to interest rate, credit, and inflation risk.

Diversification does not ensure a profit or protect against a loss in a declining market.

Foreign investing involves additional risks including currency fluctuations and political uncertainty.

Stocks of companies in emerging markets are generally more risky than stocks of companies in developed countries.

An investment in a money market fund is not insured or guaranteed by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation or any other government agency. Although a money market fund seeks to preserve the value of your investment at $1 per share, it is possible to lose money by investing in such a fund.

All investing is subject to risk, including possible loss of principal.

Vanguard Marketing Corporation, Distributor

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