Investing

Opinions on market trends and investing strategies.

Two sides to every trade

Suppose, after reading a favorable article on a company, you go out and buy the stock at $10 per share. A year later, the stock price reaches $20, and you close out your position, doubling your money in a year—a …

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Recent Posts

Lessons from the “lost decade”

Here’s a table that codifies the pain of investing over the past decade. It compares the results of investing in several asset classes under two scenarios: A $10,000 lump-sum investment at the beginning of the decade, and a regular $1,000-a-year …

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The deal of a lifetime?

At the risk of giving away my age, I'll tell you that buying stocks right now could be the deal of my lifetime.   Read More...
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All in, or bit by bit?

Dollar-cost averaging forces the discipline to continue to invest in good times and in bad.   Read More...
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Thank you, Jon Stewart!

At long last, someone called Jim Cramer out. It wasn't the mainstream press. In fact, it was one of the leading faces of the "fake" press, Jon Stewart.   Read More...
5 Comments

Forecasts and second marriages

Even from its recent lows, the S&P 500 Index would have to drop another 30% or so to get back to the level that had me counseling caution back in 1995.   Read More...
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The trouble with bubbles

The history of bubbles is a story of excessive enthuasisms, for anything from tulip bulbs to subprime mortgages. But is there something more fundamental at work? Something more innate and psychological? It seems to me there is.   Read More...
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Making the right move

The idea of not making any market moves is based on the assumption that before the bear market started and the recession kicked in, you were rational and had put together a balanced portfolio -- diversifying your risks and reflecting your risk tolerance.   Read More...
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Thrift is the new black

High up on the financial "what's out" list in 2009 is "leverage"—borrowing money to make a bigger bet, whether on housing, commodities, currencies, collateralized debt obligations, or corporate buyouts.    Read More...
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Putting a price tag on risk

The market is trying to reprice the economic system in the United States.   Read More...
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Too good to be true?

Once again, we read sad headlines about investors misled by an investment manager who had a "sure thing" strategy that led to a devastating outcome.   Read More...
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