Steve Utkus

Steve Utkus

Steve Utkus oversees the Vanguard Center for Retirement Research, which studies many aspects of retirement in America—from how individuals start saving and investing in the early part of their careers, to how they prepare for actual retirement, to how they spend down their savings once they’re retired. Steve is particularly interested in behavioral finance—the study of how rational decision-making is influenced by human psychology. His current research interests also include the ways employers design retirement programs, and new developments in retirement in other countries. Steve holds a B.S. from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and an M.B.A. from the University of Pennsylvania's Wharton School. He began working at Vanguard in 1987 and has served as director of the Center for Retirement Research since 2001. Steve is also a visiting scholar at the Wharton School.

Recent blog posts by Steve Utkus

investing

Lessons from the “lost decade”

Here’s a table that codifies the pain of investing over the past decade. It compares the results of investing in several asset classes under two scenarios: A $10,000 lump-sum investment at the beginning of the decade, and a regular $1,000-a-year …

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investing

The trouble with bubbles

The history of bubbles is a story of excessive enthuasisms, for anything from tulip bulbs to subprime mortgages. But is there something more fundamental at work? Something more innate and psychological? It seems to me there is.   Read More...
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economy

The 1930s all over again?

Is it the 1930s all over again? If that were true, it would be one very good reason to panic, sell everything, and put your money in a mattress. But it turns out that the comparisons between today and the Great Depression are (mostly) bunk.   Read More...
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economy

Three causes

Trying to understand the global financial crisis? Confused by derivatives and default swaps and the commercial paper market? Here are three ideas to explain it all.    Read More...
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