John Ameriks

John Ameriks

John Ameriks oversees the Active Equity Group within Vanguard Equity Investment Group, which manages active quantitative equity fund assets. He is one of Vanguard's thought leaders on retirement issues and has conducted studies on a wide range of personal financial decisions, including saving, portfolio allocation, and retirement income strategies. John came to Vanguard in 2003 from the TIAA-CREF Institute, the research and education arm of TIAA-CREF. He graduated from Stanford University with an A.B. and earned a Ph.D. in economics from Columbia University.

Recent blog posts by John Ameriks

Investing

More target date “bubbles”

In my February 4 post, I complained about what I perceived as mischaracterization of the performance of target date funds because of reporting that focused on the spectacularly poor results of a few small, unusual outlying target date funds … Read more

Retirement

Roth IRAs and tax deferral

With a new year well underway, at Vanguard our attention is turning to IRAs, 401(k)s, and tax planning. This year, I, like a lot of others, seem to have Roth IRAs on the brain.… Read more

Investing

Clearing the air on target date performance

Sigh … How many more times are we going to see articles like this, involving great wailing and gnashing of teeth over target date fund performance … in 2008?

Below you’ll see a summary of unvarnished data from Morningstar, … Read more

Retirement

Annuities for retirement income?

Vanguard is not an insurance company, but that doesn’t mean we don’t appreciate the potential value that some see in having a guaranteed income in retirement.
In fact, you may have heard that Vanguard recently introduced Vanguard Annuity Access™, … Read more

Retirement

Does the 4% rule hold up?

I’m often asked what I think about the “4% rule” for spending in retirement. According to this rule of thumb, an individual who is planning on a 30-year investment horizon and is holding a broadly diversified and balanced investment portfolio … Read more

Investing

The gold rush of 2010

We’ve been hearing a lot about gold over the last few months, related to concerns about inflation, the creditworthiness of various governments, and fallout from the financial crisis—all against the backdrop of what is the most significant increase in inflation-adjusted … Read more

Retirement

When to start spending your retirement savings

For many years, the government has published statistics on Americans’ age and employment. A version of that data is shown in the chart below. My sense is that these figures are the basis for much of the conventional wisdom on … Read more

Investing

A modest proposal

Given all the back and forth in Washington these days, with policy meetings and dramatic proposals to revolutionize retirement, I’ve got retirement-income solutions on the brain. So here’s a modest proposal for providing “Retirement Income Security for All.”… Read more

Investing

Another take on “A tale of two investors”

A few readers had some strong reactions* to my recent post on the benefits of making investment purchases at the beginning of the year, as opposed to waiting until year-end.… Read more

Investing

A tale of two investors

Here’s a pretty simple chart showing hypothetical investment results for two hypothetical investors. Each of them saved $2,500 a year for 25 years, using investment strategies that delivered identical 7% rates of return each year. After 25 years, one investor … Read more

<Previous1 2 3 4Next>

Visit vanguard.com or contact your broker to obtain a Vanguard ETF or fund prospectus which contains investment objectives, risks, charges, expenses, and other information; read and consider carefully before investing.

Vanguard ETF Shares are not redeemable with the issuing Fund other than in Creation Unit aggregations. Instead, investors must buy or sell Vanguard ETF Shares in the secondary market with the assistance of a stockbroker. In doing so, the investor may incur brokerage commissions and may pay more than net asset value when buying and receive less than net asset value when selling.

Investments in bond funds are subject to interest rate, credit, and inflation risk.

Diversification does not ensure a profit or protect against a loss in a declining market.

Foreign investing involves additional risks including currency fluctuations and political uncertainty.

Stocks of companies in emerging markets are generally more risky than stocks of companies in developed countries.

An investment in a money market fund is not insured or guaranteed by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation or any other government agency. Although a money market fund seeks to preserve the value of your investment at $1 per share, it is possible to lose money by investing in such a fund.

All investing is subject to risk, including possible loss of principal.

Vanguard Marketing Corporation, Distributor

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 141 other followers