Ellen Rinaldi

Ellen Rinaldi

Ellen Rinaldi has held a variety of leadership positions since joining Vanguard in 1997. At present, she serves in our Planning and Development division, where she is responsible for protecting client information, among other key responsibilities. Previously, Ellen directed Vanguard's Advice Services Group, which provides financial planning and advice to retail and institutional clients. She also oversaw our Investment Counseling & Research team, which supplies portfolio recommendations to clients along with topical commentary and investment counseling. Ellen also managed Vanguard's retirement agenda, including the development of new products and services to help our shareholders reach their retirement goals. Prior to joining Vanguard, Ellen spent 20 years in the insurance industry. She holds a B.A. from the University of Connecticut, a J.D. from Suffolk University, and an LL.M. from Boston University.

Recent blog posts by Ellen Rinaldi

Retirement

On self-reliance

This comment on Steve Utkus’ recent post about retirement struck a major chord with me:

“Our children’s incomes are not increasing, and they have their own children to support, let alone saving for their own retirement. No one is to … Read more

Personal finance

Who’s looking over your shoulder?

I’m a list maker. I carry around various lists for different parts of my life, and add and delete as I work my way through the tasks. While much in my life has become digital, I always write these lists … Read more

Retirement

The pros and cons of an IRA rollover

I recently participated in a live webcast attended by a number of Vanguard retirement plan participants. The topic was retirement investing, and questions came fast and furious. We answered as many as we could in our allotted 30 minutes.

One … Read more

Retirement

Crunching the numbers on retirement

You were getting close to retirement, and you’d thought you’d saved enough.

And then the market tanked.

So, you decided to stick it out and try to regain what you’d lost. Other changes to your portfolio structure or your investing … Read more

Personal finance

Your comments, please

From the day we launched this blog in March, we’ve received plenty of feedback on our policy of not publishing readers’ comments.

Most of you, it’s fair to say, wished we would change the policy. Well, I’ve got some news … Read more

Retirement

Retirement? What retirement?

Faced with a reduced (but recovering—so far) portfolio, children still in college, and not a clue what else I would rather do, I’ve given some thought to simply working forever. Not a bad plan, if I can manage it.

Many … Read more

Personal finance

“Generation D” redux

Thank you for all of your comments on my “Generation D” blog post. We heard from students, recent grads, parents, and investors. Your comments were insightful and passionate, and pointed to several major themes.

Some of you admitted to, or … Read more

Investing

You can go home again, but will you?

Federal Reserve data indicate that between January and early May, bank savings deposits rose by almost $170 billion. At the current rate, new deposits for 2009 will exceed those in 2008, which totaled almost $330 billion.

Clearly, you’re voting with … Read more

Personal finance

Generation D (for debt)

Graduation season is upon us. Many of us have children, grandchildren, or acquaintances sailing out of school … and hitting pretty rough seas in the job market.

I had planned to speak to my sons about investing once they graduate. … Read more

Retirement

Retired? Make the best of a bad situation

As Americans, we’re accustomed to having options. There’s always another answer, another solution, another way to lick a problem. (Sometimes, though, I think that’s how we got ourselves into the mess we’re in right now. Don’t have the money? Charge … Read more

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