Ellen Rinaldi

Ellen Rinaldi

Ellen Rinaldi has held a variety of leadership positions since joining Vanguard in 1997. At present, she serves in our Planning and Development division, where she is responsible for protecting client information, among other key responsibilities. Previously, Ellen directed Vanguard's Advice Services Group, which provides financial planning and advice to retail and institutional clients. She also oversaw our Investment Counseling & Research team, which supplies portfolio recommendations to clients along with topical commentary and investment counseling. Ellen also managed Vanguard's retirement agenda, including the development of new products and services to help our shareholders reach their retirement goals. Prior to joining Vanguard, Ellen spent 20 years in the insurance industry. She holds a B.A. from the University of Connecticut, a J.D. from Suffolk University, and an LL.M. from Boston University.

Recent blog posts by Ellen Rinaldi

Taxes

Think you’re being tax-savvy? Better think twice

An exchange I had during the holidays triggered my desire to write—and, hopefully, get some feedback from all of you.

The topic du jour is the fiscal cliff and what the government (House, Senate, President) will or will not do … Read more

Investing

When to look beyond your “back yard”

I try to shop locally because I think it’s important to support neighborhood businesses. I also cheer for local teams such as the Eagles and Phillies, as long as they aren’t impacting my childhood loyalties to the Boston Red Sox … Read more

Personal finance

Building new habits on top of old ones

I’m not one to pore over the newest self-help book. After reading All I Really Need To Know I Learned In Kindergarten, I figured everything that could and should be said had been. But I do fervently believe that … Read more

Personal finance

Is your mobile device a criminal’s best friend?

Many of us, if not most of us, are managing our social connections—and increasingly our financial lives—on mobile devices. No longer tethered to the desktop or that pesky laptop, we pay bills, make deposits, and access accounts and balances from … Read more

Retirement

Negotiating your retirement date

The headline “He Wants to Retire … but She Doesn’t” was one of the most popular articles in the April 9 Wall Street Journal.

What struck me most was the author’s comment that many of the people she interviewed … Read more

Personal finance

Tips for avoiding e-mail scams

Nowadays, e-mail inboxes are routinely flooded with scams—from missing pet and child notices, to official-looking IRS refund communications, to the infamous Nigerian money solicitations. Social media has opened up private lives to public viewing and also significantly aided identity thieves. … Read more

Personal finance

Greed doesn’t take a holiday

I was having lunch the other day with a retired colleague and friend. We catch up periodically, filling each other in on our children’s activities and our lives. This time, he really wanted to spend some talking about the retirement … Read more

Retirement

Affording health care in retirement

In my last post, I asked if you have a specific number in mind when it comes to saving for retirement, how you arrived at that number, whether you’re on track to reaching it—and, if not, what it would … Read more

Retirement

Retirement: What’s your number?

I’m at the stage in my career where I’m willing to contemplate the fact that retirement is on the horizon—probably in the next 10 years or so.

Increasingly, I find myself talking about “retirement readiness” with friends and colleagues who … Read more

Personal finance

What to do with “phishy” e-mail

Many of us—myself included—recently received alerts from banks and major retailers notifying us that our names and e-mail addresses had been “hacked” as a result of an attack on a third-party service used by these businesses to handle e-mail distribution. … Read more

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Vanguard ETF Shares are not redeemable with the issuing Fund other than in Creation Unit aggregations. Instead, investors must buy or sell Vanguard ETF Shares in the secondary market with the assistance of a stockbroker. In doing so, the investor may incur brokerage commissions and may pay more than net asset value when buying and receive less than net asset value when selling.

Investments in bond funds are subject to interest rate, credit, and inflation risk.

Diversification does not ensure a profit or protect against a loss in a declining market.

Foreign investing involves additional risks including currency fluctuations and political uncertainty.

Stocks of companies in emerging markets are generally more risky than stocks of companies in developed countries.

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All investing is subject to risk, including possible loss of principal.

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