Craig Stock

Craig Stock

Craig Stock heads Vanguard's Corporate Marketing and Communications department, responsible for delivering investor information and education in Vanguard’s "plain talk" style. Before joining Vanguard in 1995, Craig spent two decades in journalism. At The Philadelphia Inquirer, he reported on business and the economy, served as a business editor, and wrote a column on personal finance. Craig holds a B.S. from the University of Kansas, and was a Sloan Fellow in Economics Journalism at Princeton University's Woodrow Wilson School. He’s also the author of Investing During Retirement, published in 1997.

Recent blog posts by Craig Stock

Personal finance

The experts (you!) weigh in on saving strategies

In an earlier post, I asked readers to share techniques that have helped them to save. After all, spending less than you earn is the essential first step in investing. Vanguard shareholders tend to be people who’ve long made … Read more

Investing

Forecasts and second marriages

Even from its recent lows, the S&P 500 Index would have to drop another 30% or so to get back to the level that had me counseling caution back in 1995.… Read more
Investing

Thrift is the new black

High up on the financial "what's out" list in 2009 is "leverage"—borrowing money to make a bigger bet, whether on housing, commodities, currencies, collateralized debt obligations, or corporate buyouts. … Read more

<Previous1 2 3 4

Visit vanguard.com or contact your broker to obtain a Vanguard ETF or fund prospectus which contains investment objectives, risks, charges, expenses, and other information; read and consider carefully before investing.

Vanguard ETF Shares are not redeemable with the issuing Fund other than in Creation Unit aggregations. Instead, investors must buy or sell Vanguard ETF Shares in the secondary market with the assistance of a stockbroker. In doing so, the investor may incur brokerage commissions and may pay more than net asset value when buying and receive less than net asset value when selling.

Investments in bond funds are subject to interest rate, credit, and inflation risk.

Diversification does not ensure a profit or protect against a loss in a declining market.

Foreign investing involves additional risks including currency fluctuations and political uncertainty.

Stocks of companies in emerging markets are generally more risky than stocks of companies in developed countries.

An investment in a money market fund is not insured or guaranteed by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation or any other government agency. Although a money market fund seeks to preserve the value of your investment at $1 per share, it is possible to lose money by investing in such a fund.

All investing is subject to risk, including possible loss of principal.

Vanguard Marketing Corporation, Distributor

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 112 other followers