Craig Stock

Craig Stock

Craig Stock heads Vanguard's Corporate Marketing and Communications department, responsible for delivering investor information and education in Vanguard’s "plain talk" style. Before joining Vanguard in 1995, Craig spent two decades in journalism. At The Philadelphia Inquirer, he reported on business and the economy, served as a business editor, and wrote a column on personal finance. Craig holds a B.S. from the University of Kansas, and was a Sloan Fellow in Economics Journalism at Princeton University's Woodrow Wilson School. He’s also the author of Investing During Retirement, published in 1997.

Recent blog posts by Craig Stock

personal finance

Resolved …

I’m pretty sure that I resolved several years ago to stop making New Year’s resolutions. My track record at sticking to resolutions was abysmal.

Actually, I’ve done pretty well at hitting savings goals over the years, because I don’t rely …

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3 Comments
personal finance

Where do charitable donations fit in your budget?

The economic slump we’re crawling out of has done big damage all over the place: to employment, home values, businesses, and, of course, investment portfolios.

Put charities on the casualty list, too. Charitable organizations have been hit in multiple ways. …

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13 Comments
investing

Emerging markets: Innocents abroad?

Mark Twain lost a couple of fortunes through bad investments, which probably explains the pungency of his comments about investing.

Such as: “There are two times in a man’s life when he should not speculate: when he can’t afford it …

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28 Comments
investing

Musings of a cockeyed optimist

I can’t sing a lick, but a tune from the Rodgers and Hammerstein musical South Pacific came to mind as I was thinking about the pervasive pessimism in so much economic and market commentary.…

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10 Comments
investing

The “zoom theory” and market gyrations

As we sat around after a recent family cookout, talk turned to the stock market’s recent gyrations.

The older folks (I am, of course, in that camp) were grumbling about the spring slump in stocks. After listening to his middle-aged …

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22 Comments
investing

Winning the loser’s game

I don’t really follow tennis, but it turns out that an insulting label for tennis players connects to a very important investment idea.…

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8 Comments
investing

“Yes, Virginia”: The compensation question

In a post last month, I mentioned the skepticism we hear from time to time about Vanguard’s client-owned, at-cost structure.

In brief, under this novel structure the various Vanguard mutual funds own the operating company—The Vanguard Group, Inc.—that exists …

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14 Comments
investing

Yes, Virginia, we really are client-owned

While listening to groups of investors recently as part of some research, we learned something that was, to us, a bit disappointing.

And thereby hangs a tale.…

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54 Comments
personal finance

Musings of a pack rat

I am a pack rat.

A long habit of cutting articles from newspapers and magazines has left me with several boxes of clippings, only some of which have been sorted into files. On a clean-up crusade, I’ve spent more than …

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12 Comments
investing

A “decent decade” after all?

Commentators almost seem to have been competing to coin the catchiest—or most negative—label for the ten years from the end of 1999 to the end of 2009. It’s not surprising that some have called it the “Decade from Hell,” given …

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6 Comments

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